On 7th of December, Simon Riggs committed patch: Event Trigger for table_rewrite Generate a table_rewrite event when ALTER TABLE attempts to rewrite a table. Provide helper functions to identify table and reason. Intended use case is to help assess or to react to schema changes that ...

On 11th of December, Peter Eisentraut committed patch: PL/Perl: Add event trigger support From: Dimitri Fontaine

On 20th of July, Robert Haas committed patch: Make new event trigger facility actually do something. Commit 3855968f328918b6cd1401dd11d109d471a54d40 added syntax, pg_dump, psql support, and documentation, but the triggers didn't actually fire. With this commit, they now do. This is still a pretty basic ...

On 25th of January, Alvaro Herrera committed patch: Add pg_trigger_depth() function This reports the depth level of triggers currently in execution, or zero if not called from inside a trigger. No catversion bump in this patch, but you have to initdb if you want access ...

Some time ago I wrote about getting fast pagination. While fast, it had some problems which made it unusable for some. Specifically - you couldn't get page count, and easily jump to page number N. I did some thinking on the ...

On 10th of October, Tom Lane committed patch by Deal Rasheed, which adds triggers on views: Support triggers on views.   This patch adds the SQL-standard concept of an INSTEAD OF trigger, which is fired instead of performing a physical insert/update/delete. The trigger function ...

On 28th of July, Simon Riggs committed patch which: Log Message: ----------- Reduce lock levels of CREATE TRIGGER and some ALTER TABLE, CREATE RULE actions. Avoid hard-coding lockmode used for many altering DDL commands, allowing easier future changes of lock levels. Implementation of initial analysis ...

I have a mixed love/hate relationship with tests. I hate writing them. I hate remembering to add them when I'm in the zone, and application code is flowing freely from the tips of my fingers. But when I do add them, I ...

Every now and then there is someone on IRC, mailing lists, or private contact which asks about rules. My answer virtually always is: don't use rules. If you think that they solve your problem, think again. Why?

One database that I am monitoring uses a lot of stored procedures. Some of them are fast, some of them are not so fast. I thought - is there a sensible way to diagnose which part of stored procedure take ...